Bookclub in October and November

It’s been decided: next month’s book will be Zodiac by Neal Stephenson.
From Amazon:

Believe it or not, some readers find Zodiac even more fun than Neal Stephenson’s defining 1990s cyberpunk novel, Snow Crash. Zodiac is set in Boston, and hero Sangamon Taylor (S. T.) ironically describes his hilarious exploits in the first person. S. T. is a modern superhero, a self-proclaimed Toxic Spiderman. With stealth, spunk, and the backing of GEE (a non-profit environmental group) as his weapons, S. T. chases down the bad guys with James Bond-like Zen.

Cruising Boston Harbor with lab tests and scuba gear, S. T. rides in with the ecosystem cavalry on his 40-horsepower Zodiac raft. His job of tracking down poisonous runoff and embarrassing the powerful corporations who caused them becomes more sticky than usual; run-ins with a gang of satanic rock fans, a deranged geneticist, and a mysterious PCB contamination that may or may not be man-made–plus a falling-out with his competent (“I adore stress”) girlfriend–all complicate his mission.


We will meet in early October (probably the twelfth). Exact date to be advised. Please let me know of any preferences and dates you can’t make.

Then, probably six weeks later, we’re doing The God of Small Things by Arundhati Roy. This will probably be mid-late November.
From Amazon:

With sensuous prose, a dreamlike style infused with breathtakingly beautiful images and keen insight into human nature, Roy’s debut novel charts fresh territory in the genre of magical, prismatic literature. Set in Kerala, India, during the late 1960s when Communism rattled the age-old caste system, the story begins with the funeral of young Sophie Mol, the cousin of the novel’s protagonists, Rahel and her fraternal twin brother, Estha. In a circuitous and suspenseful narrative, Roy reveals the family tensions that led to the twins’ behavior on the fateful night that Sophie drowned. Beneath the drama of a family tragedy lies a background of local politics, social taboos and the tide of history?all of which come together in a slip of fate, after which a family is irreparably shattered. Roy captures the children’s candid observations but clouded understanding of adults’ complex emotional lives. Rahel notices that “at times like these, only the Small Things are ever said. The Big Things lurk unsaid inside.”

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One Response to Bookclub in October and November

  1. janettee says:

    oh god of small things really got to me, i couldn’t stop thinking about it for weeks after i finished it. it was, however, a bit tricky for me to get into. i used this study guide and it really helped me understand the richness of the prose and the story, and it broke my heart a bit

    http://www.wsu.edu/~brians/anglophone/roy.html

    here’s another study guide that might help too
    http://www.gradesaver.com/classicnotes/titles/small/

    wow reading those essay questions makes me want to read it again!

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