Still unemployed in Meanwhile City

March 11, 2009

To allay my unemployment blues, last Thursday I went into town and saw the film The Baader-Meinhof Complex. Baader and Meinhof were communist terrorists in Germany in the 1970s. I didn’t have any sympathy for them or their fellow terrorists by the end of the film – not sure if I was expecting to sympathise with them or not. As is always the case with watching a dramatised version of true events, I was left wondering how close to reality the story was. Another dramatisation of true events I would like to see is Milk, based on the life of Harvey Milk, America’s first openly-gay person elected to official office. I have seen the (very good) documentary The Times of Harvey Milk which I would recommend highly (and so feel I don’t really need to see the dramatised version now).

On Friday night, Paul and I saw the film Franklyn. It was ok. Not brilliant but entertaining enough. It was set in London and Meanwhile City.

On Sunday we had yum cha with some people I used to work with and it was nice to catch up with them.

I have a job interview today (fingers crossed!). Afterwards I’m going to Queensland House to vote in the Queensland election and I might go to Tate Modern.

I have actually been spending a lot of time on an art project about positive and negative thoughts. See some positive affirmations below:
I deserve love and success and happiness, cross stitch, 2009
I am totally adequate for all situations, cross stitch, 2009
I am totally adequate for all situations (detail), cross stitch, 2009
I am good enough just as I am, cross stitch, 2009
Loving others is easy when I love and respect myself, cross stitch, 2009


Pi

May 13, 2007

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Pi, cross stitch and embroidery of Pi to 150 decimal places.
Featured in the Are you angry or are you boring? zine.
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I Love Queer Anarchist Punks

May 4, 2007

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Needlework, 2007.
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(White) Fem uh nist

November 11, 2005

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(White) fem uh nist 2005.
Cross stitch in memory box.

This green memory box with purple cross stitched text was created in the traditional colours of the women’s movement. It is a celebration of this, but also the word ‘feminist’ is written to show the phonetic way it is said about a woman who is seen as over-bearing and angry. The work is both a celebration of the justifiably “angry feminist” but also an acknowledgement of the shortcomings of such an image in creating social change. A regular criticism of feminism is that it is dominated by white (usually middle class) women who speak as if their experiences (as white women) are representative of all women. This accusation says too often their race is invisible, thereby excluding black women and other women of colour. The white text on the white background saying “white” is an acknowledgment that the creator of the work is a white feminist who is attempting to acknowledge her race and its inherent white privilege but at the same time she, like most of white Australia, can unknowingly live with their white privilege in everyday society where their race is treated as the norm and thereby stays invisible.


I have such a need to have children…

November 10, 2005

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Needlework in Shadow box, 2005.
The text says:

I have such a need to have children but do they deserve a needy mother.

[This is not a very good photo]


You’re not a normal girl.

September 11, 2005

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He said, “You’re not a normal girl.”
Blackwork in memory box, 2005.
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The text says:
‘He said: You’re not a normal girl because you don’t let guys treat you like shit.’

I had a male flatmate who said this to me once.


You're not a normal girl.

September 11, 2005

[photopress:normal1.jpg,full,pp_image]
He said, “You’re not a normal girl.”
Blackwork in memory box, 2005.
[photopress:normal2.jpg,full,pp_image]
The text says:
‘He said: You’re not a normal girl because you don’t let guys treat you like shit.’

I had a male flatmate who said this to me once.